Red Rosari Skirt

Red Rosari Skirt

Take two! I’ve had this rusty red stretch corduroy in my stash for quite some time now. It has been begging to be made in to a 70’s inspired skirt, and I struggled choosing between the Rosari skirt from Pauline Alice Patterns and the Salida skirt from True bias. What sealed the deal though ended up  being fabric quantity. It really feels like you can squeeze this skirt out from almost no fabric! 

This is the second corduroy that I’ve made, and I love the fit of this one. I found the first one to be a hair large and long, so I went down a size and changed the length. I was originally going to go with the “mini” versus the “midi” but when I held those pattern pieces up to my rear, saw that the mini was going to be a bit indecent. So, I added 2 inches! Lauren from Guthrie and Ghani has a great tutorial on how to alter the pattern pieces to lengthen/shorten it, so I’d recommend giving that a look if you’re interested.

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On my first skirt, I used heavy duty snaps. I adore snapping and unsnapping them, but I ended up injuring myself by hammering my finger tips too many times while installing them the first time so I went with regular buttons on my second iteration. While I love the buttons, I still feel like the snaps look cleaner. No button holes wrinkling the front facing with snaps.

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Again, I went with the traditional curved pockets, though this time I omitted the tiny coin pocket. I was going for efficiency, and really, who uses a coin pocket? I did however add belt loops to have the option of belting this skirt. I didn’t think I would miss them in my original black Rosari, but I found myself wanting them. Construction wise, I was initially confused as to how they were attached in the directions. After realizing they’re top stitched down after the waistband is assembled, versus going into the top of the waist band, it came together smoothly and I’m happy I added them.

So, I now have 3 corduroy skirts in my collection. Maybe too many? I think not, I will embrace the 70’s vibes and continue to add to it. Up next, maybe a big, billowy disco dress? Why not?

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Black Corduroy Rosari Skirt

Black Corduroy Rosari Skirt

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This is a project that’s been a long time coming, mainly because it’s been on my to-do list for over a year! I was inspired to make the Rosari skirt after falling in love with Lladybird’s mustard corduroy version years ago. The use of corduroy with the vintage a-line is exactly what I wanted to add to my closet. And a nice, bad-ass version in black would be perfect to wear to concerts. So I snatched up this black corduroy to fulfill my bad-to-the-bone skirt dreams.

The fabric is impeccable. This is made up of Kaufmann’s corduroy, and feels beautifully medium-to-heavyweight. Its plush and thick, unlike some corduroys that I’ve worked with from Joann’s whose pile crushes down immediately. I spent days vacuuming my house from the amount of lint it produced when cut, but it was totally worth it. I admit to sitting there, petting the corduroy while making this skirt!

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I enjoyed making this up. The pattern felt like it came together quite quickly. I used version A’s pockets and the midi length. The length ends up coming right to my knees, so the term midi is applied loosely. It kind of falls in an awkward spot on my frame, so in my next Rosari I’ll take it up an inch or two. Additionally, I probably won’t add the coin pocket to the pockets (not useful for the time it takes) and will extend the length of the pocket lining, mostly because I love deep pockets. I left out the belt loops on this version in the interest of time, but will probably make it up with belt loops in the future.

 

While the pattern calls for buttons, I’ve had a bit of an infatuation with snaps lately. I wanted something that felt as bad-ass as I wanted to feel in this skirt, so I hammered in some Dritz heavy duty snaps. It took some trial and error, but a combo of my awl and snip scissors made quick work of putting them in. And I felt much more secure in them lining up properly than buttons might allow! They definitely feel secure and I love the utilitarian feel they have. And, it’s a bonus that they jingle when they’re not secured. While adding the snaps, I might have stabbed my finger once with the awl… it just adds to the literal blood, sweat, and tears that go into making a garment though right?

I have some heavyweight red wool in my fabric stash, so maybe we’ll see another one of these once the seasons change again?

 

Flannel Circle Skirt

Flannel Circle Skirt

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Last fall I had a hankering to add a simple, plaid flannel circle skirt to my rotation. I had been inspired after seeing photos like the one above, with girls in their simple, plaid skirts and blouses. I knew it’d be a short and sweet make, with a garment that would easily integrate into my closet.

I went out and found my ideal flannel at the fabric depot S.R. Harris for less than $5/yd, and had plans to whip it up on a weekend. Naturally however, the fabric ended up in the “to-do” pile for nearly a year. I finally dove in after whining to my husband that I couldn’t decide what to make, and he told me to use the fabric I had been meaning to turn into a skirt forever.

 

To “draft” the skirt, I avoided the pesky math and used By Hand London’s Circle Skirt Calculator to give me a cutting layout and tell me what radius to use based on my waist measurements. I added 1.5 inches of ease to the waist measurement, and it fits wonderfully. I wanted the skirt to be on the longer side so it would transition well with stockings, so I maximized my length and cut it at 22.5 inches with a 5/8 in hem. Because I made this unlined, I finished all of my seams with my serger.

 

The By Hand London directions tell you to use a invisible zip in the side seam for a fastener. Naturally, I hadn’t prepared for this so I didn’t have the right zipper in my stash! I embraced the vintage inspiration however, and inserted a lapped zipper that was 5 inches long. I finished the top of that opening with a overlapping waistband and fastened it with a vintage button from my grandmother’s stash.

I really love this skirt! It’s exactly what I wanted to add to my overflowing collection of skirts, and came together quite quickly. I could certainly see myself making more circle skirts in the future, and highly recommend the circle skirt calculator to save yourself the headache.